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to school on government money but is against government. aside from the awkward drink of water, i think his real problem is that it was the wrong night, wrong city. tuesday night in washington, wednesday night in new york. there is a place called the apollo. amateur night on wednesday night at the apollo. >> ouch. that hurt me in the crossfire. lawrence o'donnell. >> it was a major proposal that he kept under a certain wracked by not mentioning the number. he said that he was willing, in this negotiation, to avoid the sequestered and offered to the republicans' medicare cuts. he did not specify an amount, just the same amount that the bulls commission wanted. he suggested arriving at them in very vague ways, one having more affluent seniors play more. there are a variety of ways to do that. one of them, probably were most of the savings would be, to change the nature of medicare payments from a fee-for-service system, which is very reassuring to the patience, to something that he was very vague about but was probably an overall fee for a patient in which the doctor, many would argue, begins
his state of the union address defending big government and demanding even bigger government. this president thinks the only solution to everything is bigger government. and that might be an effective response to a yay big government speech, but instead it seemed like a non sequitur, because this is the speech that senator rubio's comments actually came after. >> it is not a bigger government we need. >> senator rubio also complained with a sarcastic twist that the president needs to put out a medicare plan already. tonight would have been a good night to do that, huh, mr. president. the problem is the president had just put out a medicare plan, a plan he described in the actual state of the union address that he delivered, even if it wasn't the one that played out in marco rubio's head when he wrote his own speech, and then didn't adjust it to reflect reality. mr. rubio also made a big point about placing himself in the american middle class. >> mr. president, i still live in the same working class neighborhood i grew up in. my neighbors aren't millionaires. they're retirees
a very dramatic reform of the department as the federal government came in and forced changes down the department's throat after several scandals. bratton latched on to the changes and made sure that the department actually bought into them. and in doing so really changed the story line of the lapd. and that said, this whole episode, while you would think nobody would want to touch dorn were a ten-foot pole we have been inundated with e-mails and calls from lapd cops and from the public that say the old lapd is still alive and well. even if that's not the case, and i don't think it is, the memories and the pain and the scars from that time are still very much on the surface. >> it often goes down to personal experiences with the police that are anecdotal, but of course they drive how you think about any life experience. they dominate your thinking. and of course the past is always with. thank you, joel rubin of "the l.a. time." clint van zandt is now with us. clint, thank you. i've been watching you on knbc as we monitor the situation. do we have clint? we don't have clint. >> yeah
on wall street all the way to a trial. >> ooh, this ought to be good. please proceed, government regulators. >> we've actually had a fairly -- a fair number of consent orders. we do not have to bring people to trial or -- >> well, i appreciate you say you don't have to bring them to trial. my question is when did you bring them to trial? >> we have not had to do it as a practical matter to achieve our supervisory goals. >> and senator warren wasn't done making her point. >> we look at the distinction between what we could get if we go the trial and what we could get if we don't. >> i appreciate that that's what everybody does. so the question i'm really asking is can you identify when you last took the wall street banks to trial? >> um, i will have to get back to you with the specific information. >> i think they all need water on that panel. what do you think? the government has acted cowardly when it comes to the big banks, no doubt about it. deals are cut and civil cases get settled out of court. the banks don't have to change any of their behavior. you and i get stuck, or cou
on familiar themes. making the case that government has a vital role to play in promoting a thriving economy. >> it is not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad based growth. >> a new play on the famous bill clinton line. president tackled his biggest challenge, the economy, by invoking a phrase he used a lot during the 2012 campaign. the middle class. >> the true engine of america's economic growth a rising, thriving middle class. middle class. prosperity. broad shared, built on a thriving middle class. a growing economy that creates good middle class jobs. >> and taking a page from the last democratic president, bill clinton, president obama offered what seemed like a laundry list of poll tested ideas on the economy, education and energy. >> raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. to make high quality preschool available to every single child in america. i'm announcing the launch of three more of these manufacturing hopes. a new college scorecard that parents and students can use. i propose we use some of our oil and gas reven
toy world. >> we saw with his nomination something truly extraordinary which is the government of iran formally and publicly praising the nomination of a defense secretary. >> senator hagel is an honorable man, he has served his country and no one on this committee at any time should impugn his character or his integrity. >> john mccain or roy blount are critical here if they don't participate in this filibuster, it seems as though he will move ahead. what's changed from when john mccain thought that chuck hagel was worthy of a nomination until now? >> a lot of it was iraq. >> so is it political pay back? >> it is like a lot of things, it's both political and personal. i think john mccain in kind of brushing back ted cruz was trying to sort of sort out the personal and the political. the problem for mccain is, if it looks like this is purely personal and that it's an attack, then it kind of diminishes his credibility. he's trying to keep the argument on substance, but there's no question for john mccain, it is also personal. these two men were friends, they were part of a band of broth
number of people out there are circling the wagons. they see the government coming to collect their guns, and they're preparing for fight. the only thingy figure is that movement, crude as it may be to throw these two issues together toward personal freedom, toward individual autonomy is growing, profoundly on the right as well as the left. people want to make their own decisions. they do. and it may be dangerous for society as a whole to allow this when it comes to gun buying, but there row visit. one bet you can make on america we are still a cowboy country. we like to get around in our own cars, live in our separate houses, read whatever, see whatever, pretty much do whatever. and the difference here is doing harm to others. two people getting married doesn't hurt someone else's marriage, nor does it reduce its reverence or love. having a gun in the wrong hands, freedom for that person can mean death for lots of others. and that is where the desire for freedom jumps the tracks. that's where our cowboy urge need wyatt earp to come in and clean up dodge city. and that's "hardball" for n
info about the benghazi situation even though hagel wasn't even in the government when benghazi happened. sick stuff. and it seems to be growing in inverse proportion to obama's popularity. the better he looks, the worse these characters, inhofe, cruz, mccain, and lindsey graham, are determined to look. did you notice the smile on john boehner's face sitting up there behind the president during the state of the union? if you did, you're imagining things. so afraid of the hard hating right of republicans these days of every stripe, even boehner's scared to death of looking like he might like something barack obama had to say. to do that is to risk political death in these days. let's go at it. our guests are joy reid of the grio and michael steele, former chairman of the republican national committee. both are msnbc analysts and good ones. let's take a look at this. is this delay on the hagel vote about playing for time hoping new information comes out about them? "the new york times" reports today that anti-hagel groups are right now hoping for exactly that. quote, leaders of th
savings. let's agree to keep the people's government open and pay our bills on time. it's not a bigger government e we need but a smarter government. >> the president's sweeping speech met with stoney faces including house speaker john boehner who came out blasting the president moments ago. >> last night the president offered up more of the same. higher taxes and more stimulus spending. weeks away from the president's sequester and the president laid out no plan. >> the speech we got was par for the course. very liberal, fairly partisan. >> does president obama's post speech tour and his message last night signal a commander-in-chief whose second term strategy is with or without you. >> he sure as heck wasn't trying to bring both sides together. his political calculation last night was i'm never going to e get the republicans to work with me. >> the message of the speech to my ears was speaking over the heads of congress and to congress saying do your job. >> connecticut democratic senator chris murphy joins us. by far the most unforgettable moment was the president's call to action o
they can do is broadcast. and they have a lot of rules that govern how they use the licenses. well, so what if broadcasting, um, over the air is not the wave of the future and instead it's, you know, some sort of mobile, um, you know, mobile service, you know, along the lines of what we do or some other, you know, companies might do? what this does is it actually say toss the licensee, well, if you put your spectrum up for sale, you'll get, you know, some portion of the proceeds. and if buyer comes in and they spend more than what the seller wants, then the commission has figured out that, well, the market has said that it's more valuable for another use. so that's one way. we're also working very closely with the federal government, um, on how to actually move certain federal government uses off of spectrum that's very valuable for mobile uses. there are also a number of, um, you know, efficiency gains that you can get through technology. for example, we launched our 4g network about two years ago, and it is much more efficient. so it allows us to get more use out of the spectrum. so each
enough for government work is the way i would put it. >> bill: all right. so to you it's a fiction. >> it's an utter fiction. >> bill: second thing is, the president claimed that manufacturers in the u.s.a. have added a half million jobs. 500,000. and you say? >> again, it's a question of timing and the time frame. again, in this instance, he goes back to 2010 and begins in january. the count or at least his. >> bill: first year of his tenure he doesn't count anything. >> doesn't count anything in that statement. in fact, we have lost 6 million manufacturing jobs. >> bill: 600,000? >> 600,000 rather than 500,000. >> bill: instead of a gain of 500, you say, you lou dobbs. >> negative 600,000. >> bill: on the fox business channel says we have lost 600,000. >> absolutely. >> bill: again, big discrepancy. >> big discrepancy it leaves out the fact that we still have 3 million fewer manufacturing jobs in this country today than we did 10 years ago. the president's statement almost sounds like we have recovered those jobs to the -- added. >> bill: bush administration. >> absolutely. >> bill: tha
about government overreach than solving real problems. he says, where were they talking about school safety. why aren't we talking about hardening the targets. the president has been very skeptical about that and didn't say anything about it in his state of the union. >> you've got a packed "meet the press." you've got john mccain, denis mcdonough, the new white house chief of staff, and i want to start with sort of some obvious questions that mcdonough's going to face. chuck hagel watching this. the president is not going to get forced to pull back on this. >> he got re-elected and he wants his guy. the guy he wants is someone he's sympa sympatico with. he'll have to deal with these republicans who have this personal vendetta against him. he does carry this baggage. and i think these performance issues have not helped. his performance in his confirmation hearing did not make people inside the white house more confident about him. but, again, second term presidents, their level of confidence, who they want for the reasons they want them carry the day. >> john mccain, we saw all sides
are draconian cuts. they don't want them, but will kick in. at the end of the month, the government completely runs out of fund pg. th senate republican leader mitch mcconnell had this response to the president on monday. >>> the white house will subject us to another campaign blitz. the president's hands are tied by what we propose, sign, and refuse to get rid of. >> let's be clear. when the budget control act passed on august 11, 2011 through the house, it passed by a vote of 269 to 161. 174 were republicans. >> though the president's speech will be dominated by the economy, he will touch on the other issues at beginning of this first month of the second term. guns, immigration and foreign policy. that includes north korea that gets a mention after they say they conducted a 30 nuclear test that president obama calls highly provocative. the state of the union is part substance and part atmospherics. >> mr. speaker! the president of the united states! every year the mood is reflected in the chamber itself. despite the focus of speech and the memory of newtown will loom. lawmakers are inviting
power in the entire economy. there's one -- we essentially make the government their leverage. they say they need to get at least this much of the profit, and if we don't see a huge disemployment affect from that, then it's probably a pretty good idea. yes, to marco rubio's point, to speaker yon boehner's point, it's not a solution to the problems of our economy, but it is one thing we can do that helps very, very low skill workers, people at the bottom of the income ladder, get a little bit more from what are at this moment very profitable, very profitable period in corporate profits. >> it's not just about a little bit more because that's a good idea. if you look at -- i mean, one in three american families is living near poverty. i mean, the census number -- the number of american families that are basically living on the brink of the powerhouse, as we cut programs to help the poor and the needy, is rather staggering when you look at, again, corporate profits. demos did a great study and looked at the impact of raising the minimum wage on workers, and effectively, if wal-mart, for ex
on monday night right here. i will be hosting the documentary on what happened when our government lied us into war. how they got away with it, and whether we understand it well enough to stop it from happening again the next time somebody inevitably tries it. that's monday night 9:00 p.m. eastern here on msnbc. we understand this is likely to cause political upset when we air it, but sometimes you got to do that anyway. after all, it's for a good cause. now it's time for "the last word with lawrence o'donnell." have a great night. >>> today republicans blocked a vote on chuck hagel just because they can. >> well, it's valentine's day. love is not in the air. >> it's shocking. >> not a lot of love for chuck hagel. >> to filibuster of the senator's confirmation is unprecedented. >> unprecedented filibuster. >> the debate on chuck hagel is is not over. >> all roads lead to benghazi. >> i'm going to fight zblooes willing to fight to the very end. >> i'm going to hit you and keep hitting you. absolutely. >> who blinks first? >> nobody is quite certain. >> the filibuster of senator hagel's conf
of cutting, we saw an unprecedented explosion of government spending and debt. it was unlike anything we've ever seen before in the history of the country. >> last year a gop response by mitch daniels had competition from the herminator. >> in a word i heard the speech, and it came across as a hodge podge of little ideas. >> this year senator marco rubio will deliver the republican response, while rubio was once the standard bearer for the tea party, the group is still opting for its own rival rebuttal from the man who said this after the past election. >> there is one compromise i would be in favor of, and that's that all spending should be cut. >> joining the panel now to discuss is msnbc contributor ari melber and jake sherman. jake, what are the optics here? ran paul on cnn said to me i see it as an extra response, but it doesn't really project party unity to have different responses to the president. >> i think if john boehner and mitch mcconnell had their choice here, they would have one person going forward with the response. you know ran paul is not likely to give his remarks ove
think that number is probably as close enough for government work is the way i would put it. >> bill: all right. so to you it's a fiction. >> it's an utter fiction. >> bill: second thing is, the president claimed that manufacturers in the u.s.a. have added a half million jobs. 500,000. and you say? >> again, it's a question of timing and the time frame. again, in this instance, he goes back to 2010 and begins in january. the count or at least his. >> bill: first year of his tenure he doesn't count anything. >> doesn't count anything in that statement. in fact, we have lost 6 million manufacturing jobs. >> bill: 600,000? >> 600,000 rather than 500,000. >> bill: instead of a gain of 500, you say, you lou dobbs. >> negative 600,000. >> bill: on the fox business channel says we have lost 600,000. >> absolutely. >> bill: again, big discrepancy. >> big discrepancy it leaves out the fact that we still have 3 million fewer manufacturing jobs in this country today than we did 10 years ago. the president's statement almost sounds like we have recovered those jobs to the -- added. >> bill: bush
have in the government, one of the largest workforces in the world. i mean, it's a hugely complicated thing to do administratively, logistically, politically. strong centers of power in that building, right? i have no idea whether chuck hagel is up to it, nor does anyone. none of that has been lit gaited at all. he talked to al jazeera once, gave speeches to. the actual job the guy is going to do, i don't know if i have a dog in the fight. do i care if chuck hagel is running the pentagon? as far as i can tell, no one has done much in congress to sort of sort that out. >> and the one thing that job, is a policymaker. that is not the person who decides whether we go to war but takes the orders from the white house about how to implement it. that is not the person who decides what our relationship is with any other foreign country. those issues belong in other jobs. that's what they made the whole hearing about. >> no, absolutely. and even their fixation on benghazi is located in state. they went after hillary clinton -- >> 100%. >> that has nothing to do with this job either. at the end
-discriminate protections for gays and lesbians who work for the government contractors and epa carbon caps on existing power plants. iowa republican senator chuck grassley is not pleased with all this action and has countered with a defense of inaction. quote, "it is a very dangerous road he's going down contrary to the spirit of the constitution. just because congress doesn't act doesn't mean the president has a right to act." eugene, it is hard for me to read that without -- i know. >> genius. >> what is he thinking? >> i'm not doing it, and you can't do it either. >> nobody should do anything any time ever. >> exactly. >> but is that the new republican prescription for what ails us? >> i guess. i guess. i mean, keep it in perspective. the -- a lot of the things a president can do. his action is limited in a lot of these spheres. for example, in giving benefits to same-sex partners. there's a defense of marriage act, and that's -- so that's congress's domain. they get to say what is and what isn't, but the president does have some latitude, and, look, every congress complains about every president o
. the house majority and their speaker, john boehner. >> we have seemed to have an obsession with government bookkeeping. this is a rigged game and it is the wrong game for us to play. >> as we look ahead to 2016, rubio and the jindals and christies of the world represent two different schools of thinking in terms of how to rebrand the party and how to fight obama. >>> well, it's valentine's day, but love is not in the air, for anyone here in washington. what's new about that? up next, more on the republican party, at odds with itself, messenger and messaging. plus, what do they think of the obama agenda. with all the love lost, is it time for a breakup? we talk to tennessee congressman, marsha blackburn, who says it's time to get rid of the grand old party. >>> but first, a look ahead, in today's politics planner, a lot of sequester hearings today. arne duncan on the hill, talking about that. secretary clinton getting an honor at the pentagon today. and of course, the president in atlanta, but he also does a google hangout. so get your head gear on. you're watching "the daily rundown," only
to get good things done is critical. >> also reminded of the age of big government is over. >> the era of big government. >> that was 1996. that was the year before. >> and that was, of course, bill clinton sort of playing to the crowd and saying we are a different kind of democrat. >> right. it was bill clinton, the new democrat. he was satisfying that the age of old-fashioned big government solutions to all of our problems was over, but, you know, there's a second part to that sentiment, which is that we can't go back to the time when we left everyone to themselves either. he was trying to create a third way. >> how tough is the environment right now inside the white house? take us behind the scenes, behind that curtain. >> what are they doing right now? >> what are they doing right now, and the pressure on staff and the speechwriting team and what happens when they come back with marks on it. >> every white house is different, right? i don't know this one firsthand. i know the one that -- they've got more than 24 hours to go. they're still constructing. they're still writing. he is
government programs is not great but it's really an oversimplification of the issue. >> molly, what about the plan put forth earlier this week, the $110 billion plan to avert the sequester. is that going to gain any traction? >> i doubt it. republicans have already basically said that's dead on arrival and as jake said it's not like they were getting anything done here in washington before they went on vacation. there really hasn't been any progress. there are no negotiations, nobody's talking to each other. you have these one-sided plans being put together and then they sort of get lobbed over the fence and the other side says eh, no. we're a long way from a constructive dialogue happening between the parties on capitol hill. >> jake in a piece yesterday you wrote "house republicans say if they spend the next two years like they spent the past two they'll become irrelevant." who are the most prominent republicans leading this charge toward as you put it irrelevancy? >> toward irrelevancy basically the entire house republican conference and the leadership have spent the last two years fig
around the other night, right? >> he did and his solution is essentially spend more government money. he unveiled a long list of new spending programs. he called them investments but they are really spending government money, spend that money and that's the way he thinks we'll get this economy back into gear and to start growing again. but his solution basically, spend more bought money. martha: all right. stuart, thank you very much for that this morning. let's get a look at some other things that are impacting our economy this morning. go over to bill. bill: you think about the drag on the economy when this happens, martha. what we've done here, we've taken the national average last year at this time, starting on the 1st of january, up to mid-february where we are today, february 14th. this is a period of about, oh, 45 some odd days or so and you see the blue line here as we track the gas prices a year ago, and they really got high toward the middle part of february. well take our slide rule here and put this in motion. the green line now is 2013. you see we're under it, right? right t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)